Enlil was the chief god of Mesopotamia for more than a thousand years. His “reign” began with the rise of the Akkadian empire in the twenty-fourth century BC. But if we look farther back in history, we may find another hint at this god’s arrogance and a very clear message from God that he will not be allowed out of the abyss before the appointed time.Continue Reading

The chief god of Mesopotamia before the political rise of Babylon was the deity called the “Great Mountain,” Enlil. Scholars used to believe that the god’s name was a combination of the Sumerian words en (“lord”) and líl (“air/wind” or “storm”).[1] As scholars have looked deeper into the nature of the deity, however, a growingContinue Reading

“Bull El” occupied the same place in the Canaanite cosmic hierarchy as Kumarbi did for the Hurrians. By erecting the golden calves, Jeroboam drew the northern tribes into the worship of a god whose rebellion introduced the pre-Flood world to the occult knowledge that Babylon was so proud of preserving.Continue Reading

The origin of the term for “king” or “ruler” in languages from Western Europe to East Asia is a word used by our distant ancestors for the pre-Flood god-kings, the Rephaim. And it was carried across the continents by the descendants of Noah as they spread out from the Ararat Plain.Continue Reading

In Ugaritic texts, the Rephaim were summoned through a necromancy ritual to the “threshing-floor” of the Canaanite creator-god El. After two days of riding, the Rephaim arrived at the threshing-floor “after sunrise on the third.” The purpose of the ritual was nothing less than the resurrection of the Rephaim.Continue Reading

In Genesis 15, God made a remarkable and somewhat puzzling promise to Abraham: Then the Lord said to Abram, “Know for certain that your offspring will be sojourners in a land that is not theirs and will be servants there, and they will be afflicted for four hundred years. ButContinue Reading

The central feature of the temple at Urkesh was not a chapel or sanctuary, a place set apart for prayer and contemplation, or even a meeting hall for communal worship. It was a deep pit dug into the earth used to summon deities from the netherworld, including the chief god of the Hurrians, Kumarbi.Continue Reading

In 1984, a husband and wife team of archaeologists began work at a site in northeastern Syria that should be far better known than it is. Their discoveries could be the link between the earliest post-Flood civilizations, the mysterious “sons of God” mentioned in Genesis chapter 6, and the myths of Greece and Rome.Continue Reading