The Indonesian Candidate

The major media has thus far avoided asking the obvious question about Sen. Barack Obama: Exactly how did a young African-American of modest means defy huge odds to become the likely presidential nominee of the Democratic Party?

Let’s be honest: Sen. Obama is a gifted orator, but no more so than thousands of other Americans who will never appear on national television. So how did he set himself apart from the rest of us, poised to become the first Anglo/African president of the United States?

Powerful friends. Powerful, unseen friends.

Author Robert McCain sheds light on the process in his rant against the special treatment given to Obama the author:

A 28-year-old law student gets written up in the newspapers, then gets a call from a literary agent? She calls him?

The agent then signs this 28-year-old nobody — whose only credential as an author is student law journal stuff — with Simon & Schuster. Hello? In what alternative universe does this happen?

He misses his deadline, but thats OK, because he then gets another big contract with a $40,000 advance. At this point, Obama’s story is reminding me of another popular book, The Peter Principle.

But the real killer is how, having gotten a contract based on a proposal for a book about race relations, Obama pulls a bait-and-switch, and instead delivers … a memoir.

A memoir! Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?? Unless you led the league in RBIs and helped the Yankees win the Series, how the hell does a 28-year-old get away with selling a memoir to a major publisher for $40,000?

By what accomplishment does a 28-year-old law student merit readership for a memoir? What can he possibly write that anyone would want to read? Nothing.
[…]
First-time author. $40,000. Memoir. Reviewed in the New York Times.

Now, McCain is ticked — and understandably so — that the young Mr. Obama was handed the literary equivalent of a winning Powerball ticket. But again the question the question is left untouched: Why?

I submit that Sen. Obama is where he is today because somebody wants him there. A 46-year-old freshman senator simply hasn’t had the time to build the nationwide political network he needs to win the White House. So where did it come from?

The network was handed to him, just like his publishing deal.

The next question is, to what end? I’m not convinced that the powers behind Sen. Obama really want him to win the election.

Paul and Phillip Collins have done a remarkable job of documenting what appears to be a desire by wealthy interests in the U.S. to foment a race war. Is it possible that another angry white man along the lines of James Earl Ray or Lee Harvey Oswald is being groomed for his turn on the world stage?

I hope not. Not because I want Obama to win the election; he’d be a terrible president.

In fact, I wish him nothing more than a long life with his wife and children, and a fulfilling career that has nothing to do with our government.

My fear is for the violence and the inevitable suspension of civil liberties that would follow his untimely end.

I hope my suspicions are wrong.

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