Egypt to copyright the pyramids

A copyright which is enforceable, of course, under one world government:

Egypt is to pass a law requiring payment of royalties whenever its ancient monuments, from the pyramids to the sphinx, are reproduced.

Zahi Hawass, the charismatic and controversial head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, told AFP on Tuesday that the move was necessary to pay for the upkeep of the country’s thousands of pharaonic sites.

“The new law will completely prohibit the duplication of historic Egyptian monuments which the Supreme Council of Antiquities considers 100-percent copies,” he said.

“If the law is passed then it will be applied in all countries of the world so that we can protect our interests,” Hawass said.

In a similar announcement, the last surviving clan of Neanderthals has announced its intent to copyright fire, a move that could force big changes in everything from grill-based restaurants to high school homecoming celebrations.

Seriously, this could well force some to reconsider the concept of intellectual property. Why is the American standard of 70 years after the death of a work’s creator any better, worse, or less ridiculous than what Dr. Hawass proposes?

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