Pagan Symbolism at Missouri State Capitol


Great Rivers: Mississippi

Maybe I’m oversensitive here.  I mean, my barbershop quartet gets hired to sing for a July 4th celebration on the south steps of the Missouri State Capitol, a lead-in to an evening concert by the Fabulous Thunderbirds.  And all the while we’re singing “God Bless America”, we’re flanked by two huge bronze sculptures on either side of the stage.

The one pictured sits to the right of the south entrance.  It represents the Mississippi, the “father of rivers”.  The figure holds the caduceus, the magic wand of Hermes, in his right hand and an anchor in his left.  The images around the base portray a sun god with a rattlesnake for a girdle, and a bunch of people who appear to my eye to be in distress or abject servitude to the god.

A female statue representing the Missouri River sits to the left with matching imagery around its base. Creepy.

The dome of the capitol building is topped by Ceres, the goddess of vegetation.  The statue of Thomas Jefferson at the capitol is 13 feet tall — 13 being a very important occult number.  The bronze front doors measure 13 feet x 18 (6+6+6) feet.

And the Freemasons laid the cornerstone.

Yeah, yeah, I’m paranoid.  Right.  Still, why all this pagan symbolism in a building that houses the government of a state in which the majority of the people have always professed a belief in the God of the Bible?

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