The Jordan Affair

I haven’t paid much attention to the growing flap about CNN’s Chief News Executive Eason Jordan. Honestly, my initial impression was that the story was another storm localized in the blogosphere, something with which bloggers on the left and right to hammer each other.

This morning, however, I finally took the time to read the blog post by Rony Abovitz, CTO of Z-KAT, a medical technology company, who was on hand at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland:

During one of the discussions about the number of journalists killed in the Iraq War, Eason Jordan asserted that he knew of 12 journalists who had not only been killed by US troops in Iraq, but they had in fact been targeted. He repeated the assertion a few times, which seemed to win favor in parts of the audience (the anti-US crowd) and cause great strain on others.

Due to the nature of the forum, I was able to directly challenge Eason, asking if he had any objective and clear evidence to backup these claims, because if what he said was true, it would make Abu Ghraib look like a walk in the park. [Moderator] David Gergen was also clearly disturbed and shocked by the allegation that the U.S. would target journalists, foreign or U.S. He had always seen the U.S. military as the providers of safety and rescue for all reporters.

Making the accusations more significant was the presence of two members of the United States Congress, Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and Sen. Christopher Dodd (R-Conn.).

If Jordan’s accusations are true, we have a major problem that needs to be fixed, and fixed now. If Jordan threw this accusation out in a public forum without any evidence, then his head needs to roll.

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