Who’s Really Running the War?

Have insiders in the departments of State and Defense been sharing too much information with colleagues in Israel?

[T]he FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) has been intensively reviewing a series of past counter-intelligence probes that were started against several high-profile neo-cons but never followed up with prosecutions, to the great frustration of counter-intelligence officers, in some cases.

Some of these past investigations involve top current officials, including Deputy Secretary of Defence Paul Wolfowitz; Undersecretary of Defence for Policy Douglas Feith, whose office appears to be the focus of the most recently disclosed inquiry; and Richard Perle, who resigned as Defence Policy Board (DPB) chairman last year.

I believe Israel has a right to exist as a free and independent state. I believe Israel has the right to defend itself against terrorists. I believe that the Lord promised a blessing to those who bless Israel.

I do not, however, believe that the United States should serve as Israel’s proxy on the world stage, or that the safety of Israel should be used as an excuse by wealthy men to extend control over the oil-rich regions of the Middle East.

At the same time, another Pentagon office concerned with the transfer of sensitive military and dual-use technologies has been examining the acquisition, modification and sales of key hi-tech military equipment by Israel obtained from the United States, in some cases with the help of prominent neo-conservatives who were then serving in the government.

Some of that equipment has been sold by Israel — which in the last 20 years has become a top exporter of the world’s most sophisticated hi-tech information and weapons technology — or by Israeli middlemen, to Russia, China and other potential U.S. strategic rivals. Some of it has also found its way onto the black market, where terrorist groups — possibly including al-Qaeda — obtained bootlegged copies, according to these sources.

Of particular interest in that connection are derivatives of a powerful case-management software called PROMIS that was produced by INSLAW, Inc in the early 1980s and acquired by Israel’s Mossad intelligence agency, which then sold its own versions to other foreign intelligence agencies in the Middle East, Asia and Eastern Europe.

But these versions were modified with a ?trap door? that permitted the seller to spy on the buyers’ own intelligence files, according to a number of published reports.

A modified version of the software, which is used to monitor and track files on a multitude of databases, is believed to have been acquired by al-Qaeda on the black market in the late 1990s, possibly facilitating the group’s global banking and money-laundering schemes, according to a ‘Washington Times’ story of June 2001.

According to one source, Pentagon investigators believe it possible that al-Qaeda used the software to spy on various U.S. agencies that could have detected or foiled the Sep. 11, 2001 attack.

This is complicated, spy novel stuff–which means it will probably never get any attention from the mainstream media.

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